Mayflower International Genealogical Conference

When:
29th August 2020 all-day
2020-08-29T00:00:00+01:00
2020-08-30T00:00:00+01:00
Where:
Plymouth Guildhall
Armada Way
Plymouth PL1 2AA
Cost:
not known
Contact:
Maureen Selley
Mayflower International Genealogical Conference @ Plymouth Guildhall

Join us in 2020 to commemorate the sailing of the Mayflower  from Plymouth in September 1620. Our Conference will be held on 29 August in Plymouth Guildhall in the centre of the City of Plymouth. Speakers’ presentations are still in preparation. They will include: Swords and Spindles Coffers, Clysters, Comfrey and Coifs: Life Beyond the Mayflower A lively, dramatic presentation from the historical interpreters, Swords and Spindles.  Find out what life would have been for those who stayed behind after the Mayflower set sail. Jim Boulden, TV journalist American Blue Bloods: Why our families were desperate to find Mayflower Kin From the time of the mid-Victorians, families like mine wanted to be linked to the Founding Fathers and beyond. Thankfully, my family assumed we were descended from Myles Standish.  Only we weren’t. Debbie Kennett, genealogist and author The genetic genealogy revolution:  How DNA testing is transforming family history research DNA testing is a powerful tool for the family historian. Not only can it help to break through brick walls but it can also produce surprises. Find out how the different tests work and hear about some of the fascinating stories uncovered with the help of DNA. Jo Loosemore, curator of Mayflower 400: Legend and Legacy The making of the 2020 exhibition for The Box, Plymouth With objects, images and ideas from museums, libraries and archives across the UK, US and  The Netherlands. Find out how local, national and international partnerships have changed perceptions of the ship, its passengers and an Atlantic journey made 400 years ago. Cor de Graaf MA, Deputy Director Leiden Heritage On the move In the 16th and 17th centuries large groups of people were moving to other countries for different reasons. People from Flanders and Walloons moved to Norwich, people from England went to Leiden and groups of people went from Leiden to the New World. Dr Nick Barratt – Director, Learner and Discovery Services, The Open University When Harry met Dotty: in search of the Fullers The ultimate brick wall – the chance discovery in 2018 of a birth record in Belgium, culminated in the revelation that our family was descended from the Mayflower Fuller family. Or were they?  This paper delves into the life and secrets of Harry Victor Fuller, a chemistry professor from  Minneapolis, whose ancestors sailed to America from Plymouth in 1620. Phil Revell – writer & journalist Shropshire’s Mayflower Children Born in Shropshire, seized from their mother, dispatched across the Atlantic – the story of  Katherine More and the Mayflower Children.
Exhibitors attending include Devon FHS, Old Plymouth Society, Pop Heritage, plus local groups and societies, the Family History Federation’s bookshop and the Guild of One-Name Studies. Booking will open in November 2019. To express an interest in attending as a delegate or as an exhibitor, contact Maureen Selley, secretary@devonfhs.org.uk
Mayflower International Genealogical Conference – Programme
The Families They Left Behind Mayflower 400 Commemorations Can you help? In September 1620, the Mayflower finally left England from Plymouth, Devon, with most of those on board intending to settle in the New World. There were 102 passengers on the Mayflower, including 37 members of the Separatist Leiden congregation, who would go on to be known as the Pilgrims, together with the non-separatist passengers. 74 were men and 28 were women –  18 were listed as servants, 13 of whom were attached to Separatist families. 31 children were on the Mayflower, with one child being born during the voyage (aptly named Oceanus). The crew was led by Captain Christopher Jones, who was born in Harwich. The total number of crew members is unknown. https://www.mayflower400uk.org/education/mayflower-passengers-list-  an-interactive-guide/ They came from: Tingrith and Henlow in Beds, Welford near Newbury in Berks, Bristol, Fenstanton and Wisbech in Cambs, Harwich and Great Burstead in Essex, Rotherwick, Upper Clatford, Hursley and Winchester in Hants, Watford and Therfield in Herts, Sandwich and Canterbury in Kent, Eccleston and Chorley in Lancs, Swannington in Leics, East Halton in Lincs, London, Redenhall, Norwich and Great Yarmouth in Norfolk, Scrooby and Babworth, Sturton-le-Steeple and Worksop in Notts, Shipton and Stanton in Shropshire, Ipswich, Stratford St Mary and Chattisham in Suffolk, Dorking in Surrey, Crowhurst in Sussex, Droitwich in Worcs, Austerfield and Doncaster in South Yorks. Other places involved in the commemorations are: Gainsborough, Boston, Immingham, Southwark, Rotherhithe, Southampton and Dartmouth. https://www.mayflower400uk.org/ Who did they leave behind? Are there any descendants of the Mayflower’s passengers and crew that stayed in England or Leiden and are still living there?
Contact Maureen Selley,  Secretary of Devon FHS: secretary@devonfhs.org.uk